Hickory hill mclean renovation loans

 

hickory hill mclean renovation loans

Hickory Hill is a large brick house in McLean , Virginia , in the United States , owned by a succession of notable public figures. Architectural historians, noting that an 1865 ordinance map of the area does not indicate the house, date it to shortly after the American Civil War , circa 1870.

James Patrick "Pat" Speer, a Washington D.C. dentist, lived at Hickory Hill, along with his wife Susan Virginia "Jenny" Morgan Speer. They had 5 children living with them in the home at the time of the 1920 census; their eldest daughter had already married and moved away. It should also be noted that Pat practiced dentistry in Washington D.C., in the same office where Clara Barton had previously conducted her work with Civil War veterans and their families. This was confirmed by property records for the Commonwealth of Virginia, as well as the 1920 census, and the employment address and home address listed for Pat on his World War I draft registration.

In July 1941 Hickory Hill became the home of newly appointed United States Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson and his wife, Irene, who, in 1955, after his death, sold Hickory Hill to United States Senator John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline . After the 1956 Democratic National Convention , the Kennedys sold the house to John's brother Robert F. Kennedy and his wife, Ethel , who had a growing family (eventually eleven children). While he lived at Hickory Hill, Robert Kennedy became Attorney General of the United States , in 1961; a United States Senator, in 1965; and a presidential candidate, in 1968.

Hickory hill mclean renovation loans

The antiques, chintz-covered furniture and damask curtains were long gone. So were the copy of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by Lincoln, the framed letters from Jefferson and Washington, and the big leather club chair that sat in the office of Robert F. Kennedy when he was attorney general.

The new owner of one of Washington’s most famous houses had hired workers to rip out the electrical system, the plumbing and the hand-carved molding and strip the walls to their very studs. Grass was flattened. The graceful trees that gave Hickory Hill its name were left untouched, but more than a dozen others had to be removed.

Alan J. Dabbiere — a tech millionaire with a low profile and deep pockets — arrived here in 2006 with no job and few local contacts, fresh from two years living with his wife and the first of his four children on his 115-foot Italian yacht.

Hickory Hill is a large brick house in McLean , Virginia , in the United States , owned by a succession of notable public figures. Architectural historians, noting that an 1865 ordinance map of the area does not indicate the house, date it to shortly after the American Civil War , circa 1870.

James Patrick "Pat" Speer, a Washington D.C. dentist, lived at Hickory Hill, along with his wife Susan Virginia "Jenny" Morgan Speer. They had 5 children living with them in the home at the time of the 1920 census; their eldest daughter had already married and moved away. It should also be noted that Pat practiced dentistry in Washington D.C., in the same office where Clara Barton had previously conducted her work with Civil War veterans and their families. This was confirmed by property records for the Commonwealth of Virginia, as well as the 1920 census, and the employment address and home address listed for Pat on his World War I draft registration.

In July 1941 Hickory Hill became the home of newly appointed United States Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson and his wife, Irene, who, in 1955, after his death, sold Hickory Hill to United States Senator John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline . After the 1956 Democratic National Convention , the Kennedys sold the house to John's brother Robert F. Kennedy and his wife, Ethel , who had a growing family (eventually eleven children). While he lived at Hickory Hill, Robert Kennedy became Attorney General of the United States , in 1961; a United States Senator, in 1965; and a presidential candidate, in 1968.