Relais heures creuses ed financial student loans

 

relais heures creuses ed financial student loans

Relais heures creuses ed financial student loans

Although a number of efforts have helped to bring issues surrounding disability to the forefront of international agendas, individual nations have been slow in incorporating these as national priorities. In many cases, this has been due to a lack of knowledge regarding the specific needs and challenges of those with disability as well as effective methods to integrate them into functional sectors of society.

Despite a growing recognition of the needs of persons with disability in developing countries over the past decade, there remains a scarcity of relevant scientific literature regarding the social and economic welfare of these groups. El Salvador provides no exception, with questions regarding disability only first addressed in the 1992 National Survey. The studies that have been conducted have largely been administrative in nature. Generally, the aim of these has been to quantify the magnitude of disability within El Salvador rather than exploring the health, social and economic realities of those currently living with a disability.

Although the Salvadoran economy is largely agrarian, massive population growth in the last 5 decades has resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of farmable land. The result has been an influx of previously rural inhabitants into urban centers looking for alternative forms of employment (PAHO, 1999). El Salvador’s capital, San Salvador, has absorbed most of the 16% increase in the number of internal migrants over the past 10 years and is now inhabited by nearly three quarters of the nation’s population (World Bank Social Protection Project, 2005).